Walk

The Friends of Poets’ Walk leaflet, which shows the various pathways and features to be found around Poets’ Walk, has been produced in conjunction with North Somerset Council. It is available at various outlets in Clevedon or you can print your own copy by clicking on  Friends of Poets’ Walk leaflet 

Clevedon’s Local Nature Reserve, Poets’ Walk, was named in honour of Tennyson,  Coleridge and other poets who found inspiration in its beauty. The established pathway works its way around Church Hill and Wain’s Hill and is about a mile long.

Views include: The Norman parish church of St Andrew – Bristol ChannelClevedon PierBoth Severn Bridges Mendip Hills  – South Wales.

Start from the promenade above the sea wall, with Marine Lake below on your right and the Salthouse public house on your left. Behind you is ‘Salthouse fields’, so call as in the 1600s sea water was evaporated here to produce salt.

The start of the walk

The start of the walk

At the top of the broad concrete steps turn to the right. For those who are adventurous the wooden steps to the left take you to the top of Church Hill.

Keep to the right - Marine lake is on your right hand side

Keep to the right – Marine lake is on your right hand side

Your next stop is a view point over Clevedon

Nice views of Clevedon

Nice views of Clevedon

On your right is a lookout point

Look out point

Lookout point

A bit further along on your left is the recently cleared ‘Zig Zag’ path that will take you to the top of Church hill – the steps are not as steep as the ones at the beginning of the walk – worth a try for the view. If you choose this way there are clearly marked grass footpaths that will bring you back down to the main walk.

start of the zig zag path

start of the zig zag path

At the next fork in the path keep right. You will come back to the church later should you wish to visit.

Options keep on or to the Church ?

Options keep on or to the Church ?

The pathway is now quite straight forward, with plenty of seats where you can rest and enjoy the views and hopefully the sunshine.

For those who like to go ‘off road’ there are various short cuts along the way, all to be found on your left. The first is just past the enclosed ‘Glebe field’, which belongs to the church and is also known locally as ‘the donkey field’. Further on there are various inlets that will take you onto the grass area of Wain’s hill where you can either continue to follow the footpath around or explore one of the many other clearly trodden pathways. Please note that in the summer the grass can be quite long before the grass is mown in September.

Just before you begin to drop down you will see to your right Marshalls Field and ‘Clevedon Pill’. Here there is a foot/cycle path that runs along the top of the sea defenses. It is hoped that one day this will be fully opened as far as Weston-super-Mare. It can be reached by turning right at the bottom of the footpath and is well worth a visit if time allows. Information boards provide full details of wildlife that this area supports.

At the bottom of the pathway bear left and go through the gateway.

Bottom of the hill

Bottom of the hill

Keep on past the walled cemetery on your left until you get to the gates then turn left.

Turn left

Turn left

You will then be on the other side of the church with the option either to go inside or to take the pathway to the right.

Church car park

Church car park

The next option is either to go left, which will return you to the footpath you started on, or go right. Both will return you to the Salthouse fields.

Which way ?

Which way ?

If you select to go to the right you will find more than one pathway up to your left, all of which will take you back to the top of Church hill. The first and third are quite steep but the middle one, which follows an original 1920s pathway (recently reopened) is the easiest. Following the main footpath will return you to the road leading back to the promenade where you started. The car park / children’s play area in front of you.

Back to the start.

Back to the start.

Information:-

The tidal range in Clevedon is the second highest in the world.

There is a pay and display car park near to this walk. There is also free parking on the streets around Salthouse field.

This area, along with other parts of Clevedon, was used in the filming of Broadchurch – l0cations include the Church and Marshall’s Field.

Over the years visitors to Poets’ Walk have diverted from the established footpaths. You will find lots of alternative routes along the way, both new and old. Poets’ Walk is a great place to explore and to enjoy the views and flora, whatever time of year.

All pictures taken June 2013.

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